Alabama

  • Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument

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  • Freedom Riders National Monument

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  • Horseshoe Bend National Military Park

    Take the 3-mile loop road which skirts the battlefield. Then enjoy hiking, cycling, and wildlife watching. The Tallapoosa River is perfect for canoeing and kayaking. Free.

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  • Little River Canyon National Preserve

    Explore the canyon on an 11-mile scenic drive with 8 overlooks. Hiking trails for every level explore the canyon, Martha’s Falls and Little River Falls. Enjoy swimming at High Rock, kayaking, fishing, picnicking and more. Free.

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  • Muscle Shoals National Heritage Area

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  • Natchez Trace Parkway

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  • Russell Cave National Monument

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  • Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail

    Traveling from Selma to Montgomery, this one-hour drive takes you through the birthplace of the most significant events in civil rights history as it traces the steps of the 54-mile MLK Freedom March that ultimately led to equal voting rights for African-Americans in 1965. Cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge, visit the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church and more.

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  • Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site

    Learn about the first African American military pilots. Interesting exhibits and artifacts explore the lives and tell the stories of the Red Tails. Visit hangers and see aircraft. Free.

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Alaska

  • Alagnak Wild River

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  • Alaska Public Lands

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  • Aleutian World War II National Historic Area

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  • Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve

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  • Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

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  • Cape Krusenstern National Monument

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  • Denali National Park and Preserve

    Denali (formerly Mount McKinley), is the highest mountain on the North American Continent at 20,320 feet. Experience the landscape close up with a hike on or off-trail. Denali National Park is one of the rare places where you can create your own route. This can be very rewarding — and challenging. Be sure you have water and food, dress appropriately and be ready for weather changes. Something for everyone, the Park also offers fishing, cycling, ranger programs, and incredible photography opportunities as well as a Sled Dog Kennel where you can meet the dogs.

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  • Gates of the Arctic National Park

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  • Glacier Bay National Park National Park and Preserve

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  • Iñupiat Heritage Center

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  • Katmai National Park and Preserve

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  • Kenai Fjords National Park

    The easy, one-mile round trip wheelchair accessible Glacier View Trail from the visitor center lead to a panoramic vista views of Exit Glacier. Those in for a more strenuous day hike, the 7.4-mile round trip Harding Icefield Trail leads to Harding Ice Field, North America’s third largest ice field. The glacier is so large that it consumes all but the highest peaks of the Kenai Mountains. The park also features boat tours, kayaking, fishing, ranger-led programs and winter activities such as snowmobiling and ice climbing.

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  • Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park

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  • Kobuk Valley National Park

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  • Lake Clark National Park and Preserve

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  • Noatak National Preserve

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  • Sitka National Historical Park

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  • World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument

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  • Wrangell St Elias National Park and Preserve

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  • Yukon Charley Rivers National Preserve

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American Samoa

Arizona

  • Canyon De Chelly National Monument

    Home of the Navajo nation, drive the North and South rim trails to stunning overlooks, hike to the White House Ruins and other incredible rock formations, and take part in ranger-led programs. Free.

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  • Casa Grande Ruins National Monument

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  • Chiricahua National Monument

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  • Coronado National Memorial

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  • Fort Bowie National Historic Site

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  • Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

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  • Grand Canyon National Park

    One of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World, the blazing color of multi-hued cliffs, stacks of buttes, carved gorge and valleys will leave you awestruck. In what seems a beautiful but barren landscape, it is host to a variety of plants and mammals, reptiles, amphibians, insects and birds including the once nearly extinct California condor, Chuckwalla lizard and a few poisonous creatures, the female black widow spider, scorpions and The Grand Canyon Rattler and the Diamond Back Rattler. Over millions of years, the Colorado River has carved the Canyon 1-mile deep and 18-miles across. Add plate tectonics, wind, temperature, volcanic history and you create sheer indescribable beauty. Mather Point is one of the finest views of the Grand Canyon’s most popular features, including Bright Angel Canyon, Isis Temple, and Wotan’s Throne. While taking in the enormity of what you are seeing, keep in mind that only 1/4 of the Grand Canyon can be seen from here!

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  • Hohokam Pima National Monument

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  • Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site

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  • Juan Bautista De Anza National Historic Trail

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  • Montezuma Castle National Monument

    Montezuma Castle National Monument offers access to the wonderfully preserved cliff-side homes built by the Sinagua people. Built over 1,000 years ago the Monument resembles an apartment building carved out of a cliff.

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  • Navajo National Monument

    The Navajo National Monument honors the lost tribe of the Anasazi. Within this monument are the state’s largest preserved cliff dwellings, self-guided trails and a museum depicting the life and culture of the Navajo. Located within the Tsegi Canyon system, the Anasazi built their cliff dwellings in the Navajo sandstone. Behind the Visitor Center is Sandal Trail, a one mile round trip hike to the canyon rim offering an incredible view of Betatakin’s ancient dwellings. The short Aspen Trail branches off to an ancient aspen forest view.

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  • Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

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  • Parashant Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument

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  • Petrified Forest National Park

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  • Pipe Spring National Monument

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  • Saguaro National Park

    There are two sections of Saguaro National Park separated by the city of Tuscon. The Red Hills Visitor Center is an excellent location to learn more about the Sonoran Desert, saguaro cacti, nation's largest cacti, and trails within the park. The Cactus Garden Trail just in front of the Visitors Center is wheelchair accessible and features a self-guided tour of the common plants in the Tucson Mountain District. And one mile from here, experience abundant plant life and immense views on the easy, half mile, self-guided Desert Discovery Trail. Near the visitor center is Bajada Loop Drive, a gravel road leading to one of the best trails within Saguaro National Park. The Valley View Overlook Trail is a 1.5-mile round-trip hike through a forest of Saguaros and other cacti. Along the trail, you may see Gila monsters, desert tortoises, and horned lizards, among others.

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  • Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument

    Remnants of a volcanic eruption between 1040-1100, Sunset Crater is a perfectly symmetrical crater that rises up 1,000 feet. Explore the area by hiking the 1-mile loop Lava Flow Trail or climb a cinder cone on the steeper 1-mile Lenox Crater Trail. Stunning shades of red from oxidization of iron and sulfur contrast with wildflowers and trees amidst a backdrop of the San Francisco Peaks in the distance.

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  • Tonto National Monument

    Tonto National Monument preserves the ruins of two cliff dwellings established by the Salado Indians in the 1300’s. The 20-room Lower Cliff Dwelling is well-preserved and open to visitors. It can be accessed by the half mile Lower Cliff Dwelling Trail. Reservations are required to take a ranger guided tour of the Upper Cliff Dwelling.

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  • Tumacácori National Historical Park

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  • Tuzigoot National Monument

    This 110-room pueblo was built atop a mountain by the Sinagua people in 1000 A.D. Self-guided trails offer information about the pueblo and of the geology and plants of the Verde Valley.

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  • Walnut Canyon National Monument

    Within the ledges of Walnut Canyon, Sinagua Native Americans built cliff dwellings deep in the canyon walls and lived here for 150 years until they disappeared from history. Explore 25 cliff dwelling rooms with the 1-mile round trip Island Trail.

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  • Wupatki National Monument

    The Wupatki National Monument is most likely the largest and most influential pueblo in the area. It featured 100 rooms, a tower and community gathering rooms built nearly a thousand years ago. The ruins are sprinkled along the drive, and while hiking is permitted, stay on the trails and do not take anything to preserve the archeological information.

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Arkansas

  • Arkansas Post National Memorial

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  • Buffalo National River

    The Buffalo River was the first designated National River in 1972, flowing free of dams for 135 miles.

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  • Fort Smith National Historic Site

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  • Hot Springs National Park

    Hot Springs National Park was created by President Andrew Jackson in 1832 as a National Reservation to protect and preserve the 47 natural thermal springs, making it the oldest park in the National Park System. Tour the Fordyce Bathhouse Visitor Center where you will not only learn about people who flocked to this area for hundreds of years seeking cures for their illnesses, but take in the extraordinary beauty and design of the bathhouse and its marble and stained glass. Head up Zig Zag Mountain to the Hot Springs Mountain Overlook, enjoying hairpin curves before being rewarded with unforgettable views from the Hot Springs Mountain tower. Fall foliage will have the hills ablaze with color.

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  • Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site

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  • Pea Ridge National Military Park

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  • President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site

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California

  • Alcatraz Island

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  • César E. Chávez  National Monument

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  • Cabrillo National Monument

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  • Castle Mountains National Monument

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  • Channel Islands National Park

    Just 11 miles offshore from Ventura is the extraordinary Channel Islands National Park which encompasses five of the eight Channel Islands. Due to the isolation and position at the confluence of two major ocean currents, there is an incredible diversity of life and of 2,000 plants and animals, 145 of which are found nowhere else on earth. There are a variety of hikes and kayaking trips which explore the finest remnants of the coastal Mediterranean-type ecosystem in America. Visit the park via a boat ride or flight, both of which require advance reservations.

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  • Death Valley National Park

    Death Valley is the great desert, facing some of the highest temperatures and lowest elevation in this area of the world. These extremes bring extraordinary scenic beauty.

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  • Devils Postpile National Monument

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  • Eugene O’Neill National Historic Site

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  • Fort Point National Historic Site

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  • Golden Gate National Recreation Area

    The Golden Gate Bridge is the symbol of San Francisco and spans over the mouth of the San Francisco Bay’s opening to the Pacific Ocean. When completed in 1937, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world.

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  • John Muir National Historic Site

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  • Joshua Tree National Park

    Surviving the extreme heat and wind in an environment that gets 7.5 inches of rain per year, the Joshua tree stands tall an icon of the Mojave Desert. A member of the Yucca family, the spike-leafed evergreen grows only within Joshua Tree National Park, the oldest tree estimated at more than 800 years. 

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  • Juan Bautista De Anza National Historic Trail

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  • Kings Canyon National Park

    Kings Canyon is deeper than the Grand Canyon. Visit Grant Grove Village, where a short hike will bring you to the third largest sequoia in the world, the General Grant Tree, estimated to be over 3,000 years old. The visitor center features exhibits and a short film about the history of the park.

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  • Lake Mead National Recreation Area

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  • Lassen Volcanic National Park

    CA-89 drives through Lassen Volcanic National Park. Easily a whole day or more can be spent taking in the wonders. Every geothermic feature with the exception of geysers can be found here, including fumaroles, mud pots, boiling pools and terrain that emits super-heated steam.

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  • Manzanar National Historic Site

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  • Mojave National Preserve

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  • Muir Woods National Monument

    Muir Woods National Monument is named after the naturalist John Muir who urged the government to protect the natural beauty within the United States. The park is over 550 acres, of which the Muir’s Cathedral Grove features over 240 acres of the last remaining redwoods in the Bay Area. John Muir described the Cathedral as “the best tree-lover’s monument in all the forests of the world.”

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  • Pinnacles National Park

    Designated the 59th U.S. National Park in January 2013, Pinnacles National Park is a geological marvel born into existence by a volcanic eruption 23 million years ago. The settling of debris and erosion have sculpted the exposed ramparts, leaving towering pillars, massive walls and talus caves that are now the crowning glory of Pinnacles. There are two entrances, one to the west off US-101 at Soledad and to the east on CA-146. At the Pinnacles National Park Visitor Center, you will find information on ranger-led programming, various hiking trails, rock climbing routes, displays on the flora and fauna and the geologic history of the region.

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  • Point Reyes National Seashore

    Point Reyes National Seashore preserves wilderness and their ecosystems in an undeveloped, coastal region of California. The reserve is a great place to explore nature, hike through trails, and more.

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  • Port Chicago Naval Magazine National Memorial

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  • Presidio of San Francisco

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  • Redwood National and State Parks

    The Redwood National Forests protect almost half of the remaining old growth, coastal redwood forests in the world, and is home to one of the tallest trees on Earth. Experiencing the nine stops of the Avenue of the Giants is an absolute must. The Redwood National Park is a treasure of ancient, giant coastal redwoods and their ecosystems, including black bears, Roosevelt elk, and marbled murrelets. There are many entrances to this park, but we recommend Bald Hills Road which twists through the Bald Hills and near the Lady Bird Johnson Grove or the Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway.

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  • Rosie the Riveter WWII Home Front National Historical Park

    Established in 2000, learn the history and stories of civilians during World War II through fascinating exhibits.

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  • San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park

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  • Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area

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  • Tule Lake National Monument

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  • World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument

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  • Yosemite National Park

    Some of California’s most spectacular scenery awaits you in Yosemite National Park.  After entering the park, the Mariposa Grove offers an opportunity to walk through giant Sequoia trees. With trunks over 10 feet in diameter and towering over 300 feet above, the grove features trees over 2,700 years old. Visit the famous Wawona Tunnel Tree which from 1881-1969 allowed wagons and cars to drive through. consider a hike to Taft Point and Sentinel Dome or head to the Glacier Point. All of these offer breathtaking, surreal views of Half Dome, Yosemite Valley, several waterfalls, other granite domes, and mountains that surround Yosemite. Consider a hike to Bridalveil Falls which plunges more than 600 feet or El Capitan, a giant, granite monolith reaching to a height of 3,593 feet high. At the end of the Yosemite Valley loop, stop in the Yosemite Visitor Center for information. A 3/4-mile hike from the visitor center will bring you to North America’s highest waterfall, Yosemite Falls. The 3-step waterfall drops a total of 2,425 feet into the valley.

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Colorado

  • Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site

    Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site was an important fur trading post for plains Indians and trappers, and offered hotel rooms, food, and services. The fort was a hub for news and a community gathering place. Originally built in 1833-34 by brothers Charles and William Bent, and Ceran St. Vrain, the adobe fort is now reconstructed and visiting is a fun and fascinating educational experience. Living history presentations feature costumed-interpreters demonstrating how work was done in the kitchen, trade room, and blacksmith shop. Take the easy 1.5-mile Bent’s Old Fort Hiking Trail which loops along the Arkansas River with interpretive signage and the chance to observe spiny softshell turtles, desert cottontail, great horned owls and black-tailed prairie dogs. Don’t miss special events such as Frontier Skills Day, Kid’s Quarters with hands on activities, or immerse yourself on a Fur Trade Encampment, a 5 day, 3 night living history event. There is an entrance fee or use your America the Beautiful Pass. There is a small extra charge for elaborately-planned special event days.

    35110 State Highway 194
    La Junta, CO
    (719) 383-5010
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  • Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park

    Carved by the Gunnison River, the Black Canyon Of The Gunnison National Park boasts a fascinating array of rocky spires and Colorado’s tallest cliff wall, Painted Wall, so named for the striations in the geology deposits. There are many overlooks with parking, and trails for every ability on the South and North Rims. Keep in mind that there are unbarricaded steep drop-offs. Be careful and keep a close eye on children. Stop in the Visitor center for information, camping reservations, and interesting displays on the geology and history, as well as ranger-led activities.

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  • Colorado National Monument

    The Colorado National Monument is located at the northern edge of the Uncompahgre Plateau. Sitting more than 2,000 feet above the Colorado River, the Plateau rose once, completely eroded, and rose again over the last 2 billion years. Made of sandstone, the Plateau spans from here all the way to Telluride. Beautiful overlooks and hiking await.

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  • Curecanti National Recreation Area

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  • Dinosaur National Monument

    Declared a National Monument in 1915, it is one of the most productive sources of dinosaur bones in the world. The Fossil Discovery Hiking Trail allows you to see fossilized bones embedded in the rocky cliff face — where you can imagine what life must have been like with these giants of the Jurassic roaming the land. Stop at the Visitor Center to take advantage of all the monument has to offer including guided tours. This area also features native pictographs, spectacular scenery and whitewater river trips.

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  • Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument

    The fossils here were created by the constant eruption of volcanoes which created mudflows and ash storms, which in turn petrified plants and animals. Among the most diverse and rich fossil beds in the world, they tell the story of a warmer Colorado than we know today. Begin your adventure at the Visitor Center for exhibits, fossil displays and short film and then head outside. Two short, easy self-guided trails, Ponderosa Loop (wheelchair accessible) and the Petrified Forest Loop, provide an opportunity to experience the forest and wildflowers of today as well as petrified redwood tree stumps. The Petrified Forest Loop also passes Scudder Excavation Pit where you can learn from rangers and paleontologists how excavations are conducted and how fossils are found. The 2.3-mile Sawmill Trail explores the wondrous forests of pine, spruce and fir, streams and offers the chance to spot elk, Richardson’s ground squirrels and rabbits.

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  • Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve

    Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve is the focal point of this drive. Thirty-square miles of shifting shapes and dancing light is a breathtaking sight to behold. Photographers know that light of sunrise and sunset reveal the most dramatic scenes, so camp here if possible, with the added bonus of dazzling stargazing, or get an early start. Make your own trails as you explore the dunes, five of which are over 700-feet tall. Star Dune is the tallest at 755-feet. Divided into two sections — the Park and Preserve offer different activities. At the Park, along with hiking, you can sand-board or sled on the dunes. Rentals available nearby, your winter sleds or cardboard will not work. A dune-accessible wheelchair is available for loan at the Visitor Center. But take heed, in peak afternoon, the sand temperature can reach 150F degrees and lightning strikes are more common, so plan your hikes or sledding in the morning or early evening. The further you go from the parking lot the more spectacular and private the experience, but make sure you have the strength (and ample water) for the hike back. Walking on sand is difficult. If you’re not into trudging on the dunes, or it’s too hot, there are forested trails, such as the short Montville Loop Trail, or the 7-mile Mosca Pass Trail. In stark contrast to the dry temperatures and sand dunes, Mendano Creek offers a space to splash and wade. The depth of the creek depends on the season, but is typically most lush in spring. Stop in the Visitor Center, which features displays on the dune geology and a short film, perfect for when the afternoon heats up. Don’t miss participating in a ranger-led program which examines the dunes, wildlife, or the night sky. The Preserve offers back-country hiking, off-roading and primitive camping. There is an entrance fee covered by an America The Beautiful Pass.

    Visitor Center

    11999 State Highway 150

    Mosca, CO 81146

    (719) 378-6395

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  • Hovenweep National Monument

    Along the canyon rim stand two, oddly-shaped stone towers created by the master builders of the Anasazi’s people, the meaning of which are still unknown. The Monument also has a total of six groups of ruins and is known for its square, oval, and D-shaped towers. Explore the Square Tower Group walking the two mile loop trail from the Visitor Center. Stargazing is a wonderful way to immerse yourself in this peaceful and moving setting. Make a night of it with camping which is open year-round on a first-come, first-served basis.

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  • Mesa Verde National Park

    The Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado, home to hundreds of cliff dwellings built by the Anasazi People between A.D. 450-1300. Mesa Verde is a World Cultural Heritage Park designated by UNESCO and you can spend days here, exploring over 4,500 archaeological sites and extraordinary setting. Most cliff dwellings are only accessible via a ranger-led tour and tickets must be purchased in person at the Far View Visitor Center. Make this your first stop if you plan on visiting Cliff Palace, Balcony House or Long House. Visit the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum, which features displays and dioramas of Ancestral Puebloan life. The nearby 130-room Spruce Tree House is one of the few free self-guided tours. The 1/2 mile round trip walking tour explores one of the best preserved cliff dwellings. Consider a scenic side trip on Mesa Top Loop Road, a six mile driving loop with short paved trails along the route to access some of the sites and views including Sun Point Overlook and Square Tower House. Up for a hike? Delve into the fascinating past on the 2.4 mile round-trip, Petroglyph Point Trail which begins near Spruce Tree House, or the 2.4 mile round-trip Spruce Canyon Trail.

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  • Rocky Mountain National Park

    Rocky Mountain National Park has more than 110 peaks above 10,000 feet of elevation, more than half of those being over 12,000 feet. Traveling on the Trail Ridge Road, you will reach an altitude of 12,183 feet on the longest continuous mountain road in the United States. Or travel the Peak to Peak Scenic Byway is Colorado’s oldest Scenic Byway. Admire extraordinary beauty as the curvy road winds its way through the Arapaho National Forest, the Indian Peaks Wilderness Area and Rocky Mountain National Park. Less than an hour from Denver, Boulder or Fort Collins, this drive is a perfect mountain getaway.

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  • Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site

    Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site is a moving memorial where Cheyenne and Arapaho families were brutally murdered by US military in 1864. Interpretive signage and knowledgeable park rangers share a wealth of information. Though there is not much to “see” this site examines an important piece of American history. Situated in a remote area, the 8-mile maintained gravel road can be tough on RV’s or trailers. Have water and a full tank of gas.

    55411 County Road N
    Chivington, CO
    (719) 729-3337
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Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

  • Big Cypress National Preserve

    The Big Cypress National Reserve is the swampy home to endangered species that include the American crocodile, the West Indian manatee, and wood stork. Explore via a section of the Florida National Scenic Trail which passes through the preserve. The Florida National Scenic Trail is a total of 1,400 miles that travels from the Gulf Islands National Seashore to the Big Cypress National Reserve. And of course there are many other shorter trails. Stop in one of the two Visitor Centers for more information on hikes and ranger programs. Free entrance.

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  • Biscayne National Park

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  • Canaveral National Seashore

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  • Castillo De San Marcos National Monument

    Overlooking Matanzas Bay, the fascinating bastion system fort was built between 1672 and 1695 out of coquina stone hauled from Anastasia Island after nine earlier wooden forts burned to ground. Explore the fort on your own with a self-guiding brochure or take part in one of the ranger-led tours. Don’t miss the exciting re-enactments by costumed interpreters depicting the daily life of the colonists and the ever popular cannon firings.

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  • De Soto National Memorial

    At the De Soto National Memorial learn the story of Conquistador Hernando de Soto who in 1539 landed in Tampa Bay in hopes of conquering the land and riches. Instead they were fiercely resisted by the indigenous people. See costumed-interpreters presenting talks, demonstrating weaponry and craft-making at the Living History Camp Uzita open from December to April. The Visitor’s Center features displays of armor, weapons and period Spanish and Native American artifacts. Explore the natural history through interpretive trails that meander by mangrove forests, pine flatlands and remnant shell ridges. Free entrance.

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  • Dry Tortugas National Park

    If you are looking for an incredible off the beaten path adventure, consider a trip to the Dry Tortugas. The Dry Tortugas are comprised of seven Keys: Garden, Loggerhead, Bush, Long, East, Hospital, and Middle and approximately 70 miles west of Key West on Garden Key, is Dry Tortugas National Park which is accessible only by the ferry Yankee Freedom II, private boat or seaplane. Enjoy beach strolls, swimming, kayaking, snorkeling, bird watching and exploring the fort. The six-sided 19-century Fort Jefferson was never completed due to the fact that after 30 years of construction, the development of weapons was such that it rendered the building defenseless. It was also used as a prison, once housing Dr. Samuel Mudd for his involvement in the assassination of President Lincoln. Note that the park is remote and undeveloped. There are very primitive restrooms, a primitive campground, no stores, supplies or food, so you must be prepared. You are however, rewarded with spectacular beauty both above and below the water.

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  • Everglades National Park

    Cutting through a swath of green on the way to Miami is the Everglades National Park, the only sub tropical preserve in North America, containing both temperate and tropical plant life. It is also the only place in the world where alligators and crocodiles exist side by side. Note that all the wildlife is wild, which means they can be dangerous. Please be respectful and keep your distance. This unique landscape is the 3rd largest National Park in the U.S. With over 1.5 million acres, there are three Visitor Centers quite far apart, so choose which area you want to explore in advance. Many short hikes are accessible and allow for close up views of wildlife. Or learn more on a ranger-guided hike, boat or tram tour. The Park is a haven for birdwatchers with over 350 species to observe.

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  • Fort Matanzas National Monument

    Gazing upon Fort Matanzas National Monument amidst all this natural beauty, it’s hard to imagine this was the site of conflict for land and power in the new world. Learn more about the fascinating history of the Spanish as they battled the French, British, and the United States which took possession of the fort in 1821. The interpretive ferry trip to the fort will inform and pique your curiosity. At the fort, stop at the Visitor Center, walk the nature trails and enjoy the re-enactments. Free entrance, and the ferry ride, (first-come, first-served) is free as well. Donations are accepted.

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  • Gulf Islands National Seashore

    The Gulf Islands National Seashore is comprised of 12 units, that span from Cat Island, Mississippi to the Okaloosa Area east of Fort Walton Beach, Florida. In Alabama, sites are included within the state park system.

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  • Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor

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  • Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve

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Georgia

  • Andersonville National Historic Site

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  • Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area

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  • Augusta Canal National Heritage Area

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  • Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area

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  • Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park

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  • Cumberland Island National Seashore

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  • Fort Frederica National Monument

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  • Fort Pulaski National Monument

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  • Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor

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  • Jimmy Carter National Historic Site

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  • Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

    Rich in history, the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park preserves the Civil War battleground of the Atlanta Campaign in 1864. Take the self-guiding auto tour to the top of the mountain, which explores many sites, including the 24-Gun Battery, Wallis House and Sherman/Thomas Headquarters. The Visitor Center features a film and exhibits along with hiking information and the museum enlightens via interpretive panels and artifacts such as uniforms, a Confederate saber, telescope and much more. Learn more about the Cherokee people who had roots here since before 1,000 B.C. In the 1830’s they were forced to relocate due to the discovery of gold. Their journey is known as the Trail of Tears. Free entrance.

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  • Martin Luther King Jr National Historical Park

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  • Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park

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Guam

Hawaii

  • Haleakala National Park

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  • Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

    Hawaii Volcanoes National Park is fascinating. Standing before the world's most active volcano and a landscape that tells the story of previous eruptions is a lesson no geology classroom can teach, nor can art express. Viewing billowing steam and a boiling dance of molten rock is a humbling and beautiful experience. Begin at the Kilauea Visitor Center which showcases exhibits on volcanology, flora and fauna, and the island's indigenous people. The film, "Born of Fire, Born of the Sea", is shown on the hour. Get information on choosing a day hike from easy to challenging, or take part in ranger-led programs. Take the 11-mile Crater Rim Drive Tour which skirts around the caldera of the Kilauea volcano, passing highlights that include sulfur banks, steam vents, crater overlooks, the Thomas A. Jagger Museum, and the 600-foot Thurston lava tube. Chain of Craters Road is a 38-mile round trip adventure which descends 3,700-feet to where lava meets the Pacific Ocean. Along the way are trails and overlooks that explore the Pu‘u Huluhulu Cinder Cone, petroglyphs, the Holei Sea Arch and more. Have a full tank of gas water and food before heading out as there are no services along this road. Please stay out of closed areas and be alert for unpredictable eruptions which can happen every day. Plan to watch the orange glow of molten lava at sunset or even later as the park is open 24/7. There is an entrance fee or use your America the Beautiful Pass.

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  • Honouliuli National Historic Site

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  • Kalaupapa National Historical Park

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  • Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park

    Kaloko-Honokohau National Historic Park features marvelous coastal views, unique native plants, and wildlife watching. Along Honokohau Beach, you'll see many sea turtles, and in the distance, humpback whales. Stop at the Visitor Center for information on trails such as a short walk to petroglyphs, or a section of the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail which skirts the beach. Entrance is free.

    (808) 326-9057
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  • Pearl Harbor National Memorial

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  • Pu`uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Park

    Puuhonua O Honaunau National Historic Park preserves a “City of Refuge". Over 700-years ago, this was the place where no physical harm could come to those who reached its boundaries, offering peace and a second chance at life to those who broke laws punishable by death. Explore the Royal Grounds, historic structures, and the Great Wall which was constructed by hand over 400 years ago, and stands at 12-feet tall, 18-feet wide, and 965-feet long. Take part in ranger-led programs such as basket weaving demonstrations and native plant tours to learn more about ancient Polynesian culture. Visitors are asked to treat this sacred site with respect. Please do not bring beach umbrellas, coolers, picnics, pets, or play ball or Frisbee. The is an entrance fee or use your America the Beautiful Pass.

    State Highway 160
    Honaunau, HI
    (808) 328-2326
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  • Pu`ukohola Heiau National Historic Site

    Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Site is home to Hawaii’s largest Heiau. Constructed in 1791, learn more at the Visitor Center through exhibits, art, and artifacts, including tools of war made from stone and wood. Then walk in the footsteps of King Kamehameha I to explore. The trail is not shaded so bring a sunhat and sunscreen. Also located here is access to the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail, a 175-mile trail network across the island. Even a short walk here is a delight for bird-watching, observing plants, and geology. There are two other Heiau, one of which is now submerged offshore, and a chance to spot sharks, whales, and dolphins. Entrance is free.

    62-3601 Kawaihae Road
    Waimea, HI
    (808) 882-7218
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  • World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument

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Idaho

  • City of Rocks National Reserve

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  • Craters of the Moon National Monument

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  • Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument

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  • Minidoka National Historic Site

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  • Nez Perce National Historical Park

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  • Yellowstone National Park

    Established in 1872, Yellowstone National Park was the first U.S. National Park. Encompassing the caldera of the Yellowstone Super Volcano which continues to fuel the area’s geothermal vents, geysers, and hot springs, the parks diverse landscape of forest, mountains, rivers and wildlife make it a must-see destination.

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Illinois

Indiana

  • George Rogers Clark National Historical Park

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  • Indiana Dunes National Park

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  • Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial

    Visit Indiana’s first National Park. Learn about Lincoln’s life from 1816 to 1830 when he lived here with his family through exhibits, artifacts, and film presentation at the Memorial Visitor Center. Then, walk around the homestead visiting the Lincoln Living Historical Farm replete with livestock and gardens, the Cabin Site Memorial, Lincoln Spring, and Pioneer Cemetery, where Nancy Hanks Lincoln, Lincoln’s mother is buried. The half-mile Twelve Stones Trail offers a chronological look at significant events in Lincoln’s life. Living history interpreters dressed in period clothing demonstrate activities typical of daily life in the 1820’s such as cooking, quilt-making, farming, and more. There is an entrance fee or use your America the Beautiful Pass.

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Iowa

Kansas

  • Brown V. Board of Education National Historic Site

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  • Fort Larned National Historic Site

    Fort Larned was formed in 1859 which helped protect travelers along the Santa Fe Trail. Today, you can visit the stone quarters and learn about General Custer.

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  • Fort Scott National Historic Site

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  • Nicodemus National Historic Site

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  • Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve

    The 11,000 acres of tallgrass prairie is a reminder of the landscape that covered 140 million acres of North America. Today, less than 4% remains, most of it in Flint Hills. Get close up on one of the many front- and back-country trails. Step back in time and stroll the Historic Ranch and Southwind Nature Trail to admire the impressive ranch house, barn, corrals and more built by Stephen Jones in the late 1800’s. The Bottomland Nature Trail is wheelchair accessible and features interpretive panels. Don’t miss the free 90-minute ranger-led bus tours April 30 to October 30. Free entrance.

Kentucky

  • Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park

    The visitor center of the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park features a film, exhibits, and artifacts, including the original family bible, that tell the story of Lincoln, his family, and frontier life. Walk in his footsteps as you visit Sinking Spring, the family water source and to the Memorial Building where 56 steps, one for each of Lincoln’s life, leads to a symbolic re-creation of his birth cabin. From Memorial Day until Labor Day, ranger-led tours are offered. Free entrance.

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  • Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area

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  • Camp Nelson National Monument

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  • Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

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  • Fort Donelson National Battlefield

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Louisiana

  • Atchafalaya National Heritage Area

    Stretching from Lafayette to New Orleans, the Atchafalaya Basin is America’s largest river swamp containing almost one million acres. The Atchafalaya Basin (pronounced ah-CHA-fa-lie-ah) is divided into 5 regions, and this drive passes the Coastal Zone region. Exploration is best done by water — embark on a canoe or kayak trip or take one of the many guided swamp tours. There are outfitters in Franklin, Patterson and Morgan City or head out on your own. Explore the hauntingly beautiful scenery of live oaks, cascades of Spanish moss, bottomland hardwoods, swamps, bayous, and backwater lakes offering the chance to glimpse beaver, mink, bobcat or alligators. The habitat supports a thriving community of birds — almost 400 species including spoonbills, whooping cranes, waterfowl, and eagles. Ecologists rank the basin as one of the most productive wildlife areas in North America.

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  • Cane River Creole National Historical Park

    The Cane River Creole National Historical Park was established to protect and preserve the Oakland and Magnolia Plantations.

    400 Rapids Drive
    Natchitoches, LA
    (318) 352-0383
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  • Cane River National Heritage Area

    The Cane River region is steeped in a history that reveals riches, struggles, slavery, the Civil War and more. Through the years, a melting pot of Native Americans, French, Spanish, and African people were drawn to the river, a lifeline that feeds the agricultural landscape. Today, charming towns along this route exude a gentle Southern hospitality, welcoming you to explore the past through historic plantations and homes.

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  • Jean Lafitte National Historical Park

    Six sites of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve are dispersed through southern Louisiana. One section is the Barataria Preserve. This 23,000-acre wetland can be explored on foot or by boat along the lush waterways of Lake Cataouatche. Choose from a myriad of trails like the Barataria Loop which follows the path used by Pirate Jean Lafitte to sell his bounty, or accessible pathways such as the Palmetto and Bayou Coquille Trails, all the while keeping an eye out for American alligators, nutrias, tree frogs, water snakes and over 200 species of birds. The Visitor Center offers trail information, exhibits on how the Mississippi River created Louisiana’s wetlands, and educational programs. The Barataria Preserve is free.

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  • New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park

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  • Poverty Point National Monument

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Maine

  • Acadia National Park

    Dramatic rocky cliffs, majestic water views both serene and thunderous and the graceful stream of whales, seals or migratory birds await on Mount Desert Island. The highest point along the North Atlantic seaboard was created by the push of tectonic plates millions of years ago. They would be higher if not for glaciers that sheared off the tops. And it is these glaciers and their melting that we have to thank for the stunning vistas and rich environment almost entirely encompassed by Acadia National Park.

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  • Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument

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  • Maine Acadian Culture

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  • Roosevelt Campobello International Park

    Cross over the Franklin D. Roosevelt International Bridge to Canada, and the fascinating Campobello Island in New Brunswick. Be prepared, as a passport is required. Here, visit the Roosevelt Campobello Intentional Park created in honor of Franklin D. Roosevelt who spent many summers here throughout his life. Five turn-of-the century cottages remain as well as the park’s centerpiece — the 34-room summer home of FDR which is open to visitors. The park is a natural treasure, featuring coastal headland, rocky shore, sphagnum bog field, salt marshes and forest which create an incredibly diverse habitat. Visit the Mulholland Point Lighthouse and the harbor seals that congregate here, enjoy the many scenic overlooks in search of passing whales and porpoises, stroll the beach, camp overnight and luxuriate in the peaceful surroundings. The park is free and the grounds are open year-round though the facilities are only open Memorial Day to Columbus Day. Just adjacent is Herring Cove Provincial Park which features a mile-long beach, hiking, camping and golf course.

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  • Saint Croix Island International Historic Site

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Maryland

Massachusetts

  • Adams National Historical Park

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  • Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park

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  • Boston African American National Historic Site

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  • Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area

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  • Boston National Historical Park

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  • Cape Cod National Seashore

    Great Island was once an actual island, but hundreds of years of sweeping current and eroding coast have created sandbars which gradually grew to connect the island to the mainland. This sandy peninsula is part of the Cape Cod National Seashore and is home to pristine sandy beaches, marshes, ponds and uplands. Rich in history, it was inhabited by local natives known as Punonakanits and then settled by Europeans in the 1600s who altered the land which was largely deforested by 1800. This area has several miles of trails, including a challenging 8-mile loop around the island. Bring drinking water on your hike as there is no fresh water available on the trail. If you want to access Jeremy Point, the furthest spot on the island, make sure you hike at the lowest tides as it is submerged otherwise.

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  • Essex National Heritage Area

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  • Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site

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  • John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site

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  • Longfellow House Washingtons Headquarters National Historic Site

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  • Lowell National Historical Park

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  • Minute Man National Historical Park

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  • New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park

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  • Salem Maritime National Historic Site

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  • Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site

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  • Springfield Armory National Historic Site

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Michigan

  • Isle Royale National Park

    Isle Royal National Park is an isolated car-free island which enhances the solitude and natural beauty. Enjoy hiking, fishing, canoeing, kayaking, and shipwreck scuba diving (permit required). Wildlife abounds, look for Common loons, moose, wolves, and beaver. Enjoy overnight camping, back-country camping, or stay at the Lakeside Lodge or cabins. There is a fee to enter, or use your America the Beautiful Pass. It does take advance planning to get here, but the experience is well worth it. There are four passenger ferries and one seaplane from Grand Portage in Minnesota, or Houghton and Copper Harbor in Michigan. Reservations recommended, especially in peak summer season. Check the NPS website for details.

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  • Keweenaw National Historical Park

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  • Motor Cities National Heritage Area

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  • Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

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  • River Raisin National Battlefield Park

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  • Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway

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  • Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore

    Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore features miles of sandy beach and towering dunes that rise 450 feet. There are 100 miles of hiking and biking trails and many are open for skiing and snowshoeing in winter. Expansive beaches offer great swimming, boating, tubing and fishing, both on Lake Michigan and in 21 inland lakes which offer calmer and warmer waters. You’ll find equipment rentals available on-site. Take part in the year-round ranger led adventures and make it an overnight with a variety of camping options. Don’t miss the 7.4 mile Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive which passes park highlights including the Pierce Stocking Covered Bridge built in the 1960’s. Also visit the Sleeping Bear Point Maritime Museum, a Coast Guard Life-Saving Service Station. During summer at 3:00 pm, there is a rescue drill re-enactment. At nearby Glen Haven Historic Village explore the General Store, Cannery Boathouse, and Blacksmith Shop. The park is extremely popular, so if you plan on staying in the area during peak summer season, advance reservations for camping or hotels is recommended.

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Minnesota

  • Grand Portage National Monument

    The Grand Portage National Monument preserves the history of the Grand Portage Ojibwe and the North West Company during the fur trade era. Explore exhibits and the Historic Depot which features three log buildings, the voyageurs encampment, and historic gardens to imagine what it must have been like when the Ojibwe and French traders lived and worked here. Don't miss living history events throughout the summer, or the chance to participate in a guided ranger-led walk or bread-making demonstrations. The park is free year-round, donations appreciated. Grand Portage Rendezvous Days and PowWow take place the second full weekend in August.

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  • Mississippi National River and Recreational Area

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  • Pipestone National Monument

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  • Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway

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  • Voyageurs National Park

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

  • Big Hole National Battlefield

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  • Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area

    The views are outstanding as you experience desert-like surroundings, wildlife used to harsh conditions and millions of years of erosion creating unsurpassed beauty. Dry climate, immense rocky outcrops and the lack of trees are a striking change and awe-inspiring. Get a close up view of the canyon by heading north into Montana and stopping at the Devil Canyon Overlook where the earth drops about 1,000 feet below. Many hike trailheads are near here so be sure you made that stop at the visitor center as they are not easily seen from the road. You can also experience the canyon from the water by taking a boat tour.

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  • Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site

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  • Glacier National Park

    Head through all of the scenic wonders of Glacier National Park. From the glacier-formed turquoise Lake McDonald and Lake St. Mary, the old-growth forests, regions of forest fires, and all surrounded by endless mountain peaks.

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  • Grant Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site

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  • Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument

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  • Nez Perce National Historical Park

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  • Yellowstone National Park

    Established in 1872, Yellowstone National Park was the first U.S. National Park. Encompassing the caldera of the Yellowstone Super Volcano which continues to fuel the area’s geothermal vents, geysers, and hot springs, the parks diverse landscape of forest, mountains, rivers and wildlife make it a must-see destination.

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Nebraska

Nevada

  • Death Valley National Park

    Death Valley is the great desert, facing some of the highest temperatures and lowest elevation in this area of the world. These extremes bring extraordinary scenic beauty.

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  • Great Basin National Park

    Nevada’s only National Park, the Great Basin National Park features caves, a glacier atop the 13,063 foot Wheeler Peak, and more.

    Plan a visit to one of the park’s many caves, enjoy a hike, or drive on the 12-mile Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive.

    The park has an admission fee. The America the Beautiful Annual Pass is accepted.

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  • Lake Mead National Recreation Area

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  • Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument

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New Hampshire

New Jersey

  • Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area

    nps.gov

    Begin at Kittatinny Point Visitor Center near exit 1. Nestled at the foot of Mt. Tammany, learn about the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area and get information about hiking, backpacker camping and more. The visitor center is open daily from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend. The preservation of this vast natural treasure is an important habitat for bald eagles, peregrine falcons, deer, bears, bobcat and a diverse array of plants. Leaving from the Visitor Center is Old Mine Road, considered to be one of the oldest continually-used roads in the United States. The road is thought to have begun as a Paleo Indian foot trail, and used as trail wagon road used to convey American Revolutionary War regiments. Today it is a paved, narrow winding road that travels along the Delaware River and through the entire Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Our scenic route follows this road. Note that Old Mine Road is closed in winter.

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  • Ellis Island Part of Statue of Liberty National Monument

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  • Gateway National Recreation Area

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  • Great Egg Harbor River

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  • Morristown National Historical Park

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  • New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve

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  • Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park

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  • Thomas Edison National Historical Park

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New Mexico

  • Aztec Ruins National Monument

    Visit the ruins of a Pueblo village with more than 500 rooms with a self-guided tours and interpretative trails that present the history.

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  • Bandelier National Monument

    Visit the Bandelier National Monument, where Anasazi Native Americans built cliff-side dwellings from local volcanic ash. The Visitor Center features a 14 minute film, exhibits on the history of the area, interpretive programs and hiking options. Explore the archaeological sites with the 1.2 mile Main Loop Trail where you can climb ladders into cavates (small human-carved alcoves). This trail passes Big Kiva, Tyuonyi, Talus House and Long House dwellings. The 2.5 mile Falls Trail descends 700 feet and has spectacular views, dessert vegetation, two waterfalls and ends on the banks of the Rio Grande.

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  • Capulin Volcano National Monument

    Capulin Volcano National Monument has an awesome spiral drive up to an extinct volcano, Capulin Mountain, where you can climb down into its crater, hike around the rim, or enjoy the view all the way into Colorado and Oklahoma. Around the monument, ancient humans known as Folsom Man hunted prehistoric animals with spears.

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  • Carlsbad Caverns National Park

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  • Chaco Culture National Historical Park

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  • El Malpais National Monument

    nps.gov

    About an hour from Albuquerque, this scenic drive heads through the lava fields within El Malpais National Monument. Spanish for “the badlands”, the terrain is a fascinating geologic mix of lava flows, cinder cones, pressure ridges and lava tubes. Created by volcanoes to the southwest a few thousand years ago, El Malpais is an amazing visual splendor with sandstone cliffs and arches, the Zuni Mountains, and distant volcanic craters.

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  • El Morro National Monument

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  • Fort Union National Monument

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  • Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument

    Arriving at the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, stop at the visitor center to orient yourself, pick up the guide, and explore exhibits featuring Mogollon artifacts and the lives of the Cliff Dwellers as well as a video on the Chiricahua Apache who consider this area home. These fascinating structures built by the Tularosa Mogollon people in the late 1200s consist of five natural caves that contain the ruins of the dwelling — a total of 40 interconnected rooms.

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  • Manhattan Project National Historical Park

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  • Pecos National Historical Park

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  • Petroglyph National Monument

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  • Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument

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  • Valles Caldera National Preserve

    Once a fiery volcano between 15,000 and 25,000 feet high, Valles eventually collapsed onto itself leaving a caldera spanning more than 175 square miles. A private ranch until 2000, the Valles Caldera National Preserve is now open to the public. There are two fee-free hiking trails off NM-4, The Coyote Call, 3 miles round trip and Valle Grande, a 2 mile round trip.

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  • White Sands National Monument

    Once you enter, stop at the White Sands National Monument Visitor Center on your right. This is a great place to learn about the unusual and magical landscape. Take in one of their interpretive programs such as Sunset Strolls, or Full Moon Bike ride. The center also features a museum, bookstore and gift shop. The wave-like dunes create a blanket of shifting shadows. Patterns streak, ripples fold, portraying hundreds of shades of white. The contrast of brilliant blue skies is a photographers dream. The white sands are actually gypsum crystals created by the evaporation of Lake Lucero and Alkali Flat, a remnant of the ancient Lake Otero. Blowing winds create magnificent dunes which move west to east as much as thirty feet per year. Looking a lot like snow, a popular activity is sledding on the dunes. It is permitted where there is no vegetation and away from parking area and roads. Sleds can be purchased at the visitor center. The monument is surrounded by the White Sands Missile Range. The roads are occasionally closed to traffic as test missiles are fired. It is best to contact the park the day before arriving to check on closures, either on nps.gov or by calling (575) 679-2599.

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New York

North Carolina

  • Blue Ridge National Heritage Area

    Learn about the Blue Ridge Parkway’s history via interactive displays and videos at the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area’s Visitor Center.

  • Blue Ridge Parkway

    One of the most popular scenic drives in the United States, the Blue Ridge Parkway travels along the southern Appalachian Mountains, connecting Shenandoah National Park in Virginia to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina. The cliff-hugging road offers sweeping views, fascinating and diverse flora and fauna, geologic wonders and a myriad of recreation opportunities. Spectacular in any season, the Parkway is renowned for its fall foliage which displays a vivid palette of color. Sections of the Parkway may be closed in winter; it is advisable to check for up-to-date road conditions before heading out.

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  • Cape Hatteras National Seashore

    Following the delicate string of barrier islands dividing the powerful Atlantic Ocean and the inner shores of North Carolina, this scenic road explores pristine seashore, natural areas, historical sites, museums and lighthouses.

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  • Cape Lookout National Seashore

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  • Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site

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  • Fort Raleigh National Historic Site

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  • Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    Explore the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the most visited national park in the United States, via a spectacular roadwork built in the 1930s that includes tunnels, stone bridges and ample twisty roads.

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  • Guilford Courthouse National Military Park

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  • Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor

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  • Moores Creek National Battlefield

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  • Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail

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  • Wright Brothers National Memorial

    The Wright Brothers came to this region with a dream, seeking the strong winds and open spaces for testing their aircraft and in 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright would fly the first controlled airplane. At the Visitor Center, behold a full scale reproduction of the 1903 Powered Flyer, the 1902 Wright Glider, and other fascinating displays. Stand atop Big Kill Devil Hill — where glider tests were conducted. Explore the reconstructed Living Quarters and Hangar and Centennial Pavilion, which features exhibits on the history and challenges of aviation. There is a small entrance fee valid for 7 days. Children under 16 are free.

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North Dakota

Northern Mariana Islands

  • American Memorial Park

    American Memorial Park honors the American and Marianas people who gave their lives during the Marianas Campaign of World War II.

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Ohio

  • Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument

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  • Cuyahoga Valley National Park

    Cuyahoga Valley National Park captivates with 33,000 acres of diverse habitat, recreation opportunities, and history. Stop at the Canal Exploration Center near Lock 38 for regional and historic information. Interactive exhibits take you back in time through the eyes of the people who built, worked, and lived along the canal. The popular 100-mile Ohio and Erie Canal Towpath Trail for walking, jogging, biking, and in some areas, horseback riding, runs through the center of the park, connecting the many historic sites, other nature trails, and communities. Biking is a great way cover a lot of distance while exploring, and rentals are available from local outfitters. If you’re not up for the return trip, simply Bike Aboard! on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad. Climb aboard one of 8 stations along the route to take you and your bike back for a small fee. The Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad travels from Cleveland to Akron on vintage rail cars and also offers sightseeing excursions, all-day hop on/hop off passenger passes, and special events. Free entrance.

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  • David Berger National Memorial

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  • Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park

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  • Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis National Historic Site

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  • First Ladies National Historic Site

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  • Hopewell Culture National Historical Park

    The Hopewell Culture National Historical Park preserves six separate sites of monumental earthenworks built by the Hopewell Indians that thrived here. Four are open to the public. Mound City Group is fully-restored and consists of a 13-acre earth enclosure in a curved rectangle shape. Nestled inside are more than 20 mounds. The visitor center offers a wealth of information on the history of the Hopewell Culture, artifacts that were found here and how the mounds may have been constructed and used. Walk through the sacred site and on a paved path along the Scioto River to marvel and wonder how these monumental earthenworks were built to such a large scale without modern machines. Free entrance.

    16062 OH-104
    Chillicothe, OH
    (740) 774-1126
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  • James A Garfield National Historic Site

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  • National Aviation Heritage Area

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  • Perry’s Victory & International Peace Memorial

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  • William Howard Taft National Historic Site

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Oklahoma

Oregon

  • Crater Lake National Park

    Crater Lake and the Pumice Desert were formed over 7,000 years ago when Mount Mazama was destroyed during a massive eruption. Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States and its pristine blue waters are glorious for swimming, scuba diving or for a boat tour of the former volcano. Access to the water and tours are only accessible by a 2.2-mile round trip strenuous hiking trail, which due to extreme snowfalls are only open from June to October. It’s best to check for current conditions beforehand.

    Surrounding the lake is the renowned 33-mile Rim Drive. Many observation points, turnouts and interpretive signs offer opportunities to stop and take in the incredible scenery and learn the geologic history of the area. Off of Rim Drive are several trails to explore, including the half-mile Castle Crest Wildflower Garden Trail through a forest to a wetland wildflower-filled meadow which peaks in July and August. Crater Lake National Park also hosts thirty-three miles of The Pacific Crest Trail which stretches from the Mexican to Canadian borders, offering hikers magnificent views of the mountains surrounding the lake and a chance to spot some of the many mammals from the little brown bat to the Roosevelt elk, birds, amphibians and reptiles.

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  • Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

    The 366-acre Fort Vancouver National Site in Vancouver Washington encompasses multiple attractions, Fort Vancouver, Pearson Air Museum and Pearson Field Education Center, and the McLoughlin House. Orient yourself at the Visitor Center, which features a film, interpretive exhibits and artifacts, as well as tours and educational programs. Explore the reconstructed Fort Site with buildings such as the Bakehouse, Blacksmith Shop and Chief Factor’s Residence. Officer’s Row features 22 restored 19th-century buildings, all listed on the National Historic Register. Large expanses of grass and forest surround the buildings with ample opportunity to let kids run free and enjoy a picnic. Don’t miss 3rd Saturday Living History demonstrations portraying members of the Civil War-era 1st Oregon Volunteer Cavalry.

    1501 E Evergreen Boulevard
    Vancouver, WA
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  • John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

    Stop at the Clarno Unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, part of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument and discover the Palisades. The 150-foot craggy pinnacles were formed about 45 million years ago by a series of ash-laden mudflows that encased the remains of a semitropical forest. There is no visitor center here, but you will find information panels, a shaded picnic area, water fountain and restroom. From the parking lot — literally walk back in time on the Geologic Time Trail, (1/2-mile round trip) each foot of trail representing 37,000 years of history described on interpretive panels.

    At the Painted Hills Unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, the main parking area features an oasis of green grass and shade trees perfect for picnics, as well as restrooms and water. Only nature’s hand could paint such beauty — layers in a vivid palette of orange, red, black, green, and lavender. The deeply saturated hues are created by different layers of volcanic ash that have oxidized since being exposed to air by erosion. Explore the scenery on three short trails, Painted Hills Overlook and Trail, Leaf Hill Trail and Painted Cove Trail, the latter of which allows you to get very close on a boardwalk that circumnavigates a painted hill. Please do not walk on, or touch the hills as they will be permanently damaged. The Carroll Rim Trail is a 1.5-mile round trip that hugs the mountain-side, climbing 400-feet to a volcanic caprock overlook.

    If you take a left on OR-19 you head towards the Sheep Rock Unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument from this junction. Unending sunshine and warm temperatures make for great fruit growing and in Kimberly you will find orchards of apples, pears, plums, nectarines apricots and more. Take advantage of roadside stands or pick your own farms.

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  • Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

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  • Nez Perce National Historical Park

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  • Oregon Caves National Monument & Preserve

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Pennsylvania

  • Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historical Park

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  • Chesapeake Bay

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  • Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Watertrailway

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  • Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area

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    Begin at Kittatinny Point Visitor Center near exit 1. Nestled at the foot of Mt. Tammany, learn about the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area and get information about hiking, backpacker camping and more. The visitor center is open daily from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend. The preservation of this vast natural treasure is an important habitat for bald eagles, peregrine falcons, deer, bears, bobcat and a diverse array of plants. Leaving from the Visitor Center is Old Mine Road, considered to be one of the oldest continually-used roads in the United States. The road is thought to have begun as a Paleo Indian foot trail, and used as trail wagon road used to convey American Revolutionary War regiments. Today it is a paved, narrow winding road that travels along the Delaware River and through the entire Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Our scenic route follows this road. Note that Old Mine Road is closed in winter.

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  • Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage

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  • Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site

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  • Eisenhower National Historic Site

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  • First State National Historical Park

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  • Flight 93 National Memorial

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  • Fort Necessity National Battlefield

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  • Friendship Hill National Historic Site

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  • Gettysburg National Military Park

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  • Gloria Dei Church National Historic Site

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  • Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site

    Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site showcases the beginning of industrialization in America. Learn how iron was melted and cast, cannons molded and about the lives of the workers and their families through costumed-interpreters, living history programs and exhibits. Hopewell Furnace consists of 14 restored structures including an original water wheel, the blacksmith shop, the “big house”, as well as 848 wooded acres perfect for a hike, wildlife watching and a picnic. Free entrance, donations are appreciated.

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  • Independence National Historical Park

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  • Johnstown Flood National Memorial

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  • Lower Delaware National Wild and Scenic River

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  • Oil Region National Heritage Area

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  • Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail

    At Theodore Roosevelt Island which honors the 26th President of the United States, walk a section of the Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail, a non-continuous 830-mile network of trail, and along with serene beauty of nature, be ready for muddy patches and hills.

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  • Rivers Of Steel National Heritage Area

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  • Schuylkill River Valley National Heritage Area

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  • Steamtown National Historic Site

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  • Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial

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  • Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River

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  • Valley Forge National Historical Park

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Puerto Rico

Rhode Island

  • Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor

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  • Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park

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  • Roger Williams National Memorial

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  • Touro Synagogue National Historic Site

    Built in 1763, the simple but architecturally-striking Touro Synagogue is the oldest in the United States and a fascinating look at back on Colonial life and religious freedom in Rhode island no matter what your faith. There is a fee to enter which includes a 1/2 hour tour and access to the Loeb Visitor Center which features an orientation film and interactive exhibits.

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South Carolina

  • Charles Pinckney National Historic Site

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  • Congaree National Park

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  • Cowpens National Battlefield

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  • Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park

    The American Civil War began at Fort Sumter when Confederates fired upon Union soldiers on April 12, 1861. Learn from compelling exhibits at the Fort Sumter Visitor Education Center which is free. To visit Fort Sumter, you will have to take a ferry ride through the National Park Service authorized concession-operated ferry, or a personal boat. Ferries leave from Charleston/Liberty Square or Mt. Pleasant/Patriots Point. Advance reservations are highly recommended. During the ferry ride park rangers enlighten with an enriching history lesson, and views from the water are fabulous. Keep your eyes out for dolphins. At the fort, take a self-guided tour to explore the fort construction, barracks, Officer’s and Enlisted Men’s Quarters, cannons, and more. Don’t miss one of the ranger-led programs.

    340 Concord Street
    Charleston, SC
    (843) 577-0242
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  • Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor

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  • Ninety Six National Historic Site

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  • Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail

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  • Reconstruction Era National Historical Park

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  • South Carolina National Heritage Corridor

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South Dakota

  • Badlands National Park

    Millions of years of sedimentary layers, shaped by wind and water create a fascinating and diverse landscape. Take advantage of the pullouts for incredible views of this unique landscape. As well, there is a wide variety of wildlife, bison, bighorn sheep, deer, pronghorn, prairie dogs, and black-footed ferrets. The Badlands is home to many fossilized creatures from the past, including dinosaurs. Fossil Trail is an easy, .25-mile boardwalk path that displays some of these fossils. Remember to always have water with you in this area — especially in summer as the heat is dry and intense and shade is not easily found. A full tank of gas is also recommended before driving into the Badlands.

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  • Jewel Cave National Monument

    The Jewel Cave is a cave with calcite crystals. A guided tour of the cave is available.

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  • Kings Mountain National Military Park

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  • Minuteman Missile National Historic Site

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  • Missouri National Recreational River

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  • Mount Rushmore National Memorial

    At the Mount Rushmore National Monument visitor center, learn about the carving of Mount Rushmore and why Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, and Theodore Roosevelt were chosen for this national monument. Enjoy short films about the monument, it’s history and the surrounding park area and visit the sculptor’s studio. The sculpting began in 1927 and was declared finished in 1942, a year after Gutzon Borglum, one of the masterminds behind the project, died.

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  • Wind Cave National Park

    Wind Cave National Park not only provides a habitat for bison, coyotes, elk, mule deer, prairie dogs, pronghorns, and more, but also a network of caves, including Wind Cave. There are guided tours of these caves.

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Tennessee

Texas

  • Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument

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  • Amistad National Recreation Area

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  • Big Bend National Park

    Big Bend National Park is about the size of Rhode Island and while all but two percent of the park is desert, the landscape is extremely diverse. From the Chisos Mountains in the center resembling a green island in the desert, to thermal springs adjacent the Rio Grande at the southern edge, the park is home to more types of birds, bats and cacti than any other national park in the U.S. including more than 60 species of cactus, 1,100 species of plants, 450 species of birds, 56 species of reptiles, 75 species of mammals and 3,600 species of insects.

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  • Big Thicket National Preserve

    Big Thicket National Preserve protects the semitropical environment that once covered eastern Texas. Botanists and nature lovers will enjoy 20 different types of orchids and 4-of-5 insect consuming plants.

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  • Chamizal National Memorial

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  • Fort Davis National Historic Site

    Built in 1854 by the US Army to protect emigrants, freighters, mail coaches and travelers on the San-Antonia-El Paso Road and Chihuahua Trail from being attacked by Comanches and later, Apaches, this is one of the best-preserved examples of 19th-century frontier forts. There are interpretive displays, museum and book shop and the opportunity to experience the daily routine of a soldier replete with bugle calls and an 1875 dress retreat parade. There is a small fee per person to enter and children under 15 are free.

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  • Guadalupe Mountains National Park

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  • Lake Meredith National Recreation Area

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  • Lyndon B. Johnson National Historic Park

    At Lyndon B. Johnson National Historic Park, visit his boyhood home and Johnson Settlement where Lyndon Johnson’s grandfather and great-uncle established cattle droving headquarters. Their log cabin, barns, and windmill still stand. Stop at the visitor center for historical information and video. You can obtain a free driving permit and self-guided CD from the Visitor Center to tour the LBJ Ranch 14 miles away. At LBJ Ranch, visit Lyndon B. Johnson’s reconstructed birth place, the schoolhouse he attended, the Texas White House where his work as president was done while he was vacationing here, and the cemetery where he is buried. Trails allow you to explore the farmlands, nature, and wildlife.

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  • Padre Island National Seashore

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  • Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park

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  • Rio Grande Wild and Scenic River

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  • San Antonio Missions National Historic Park

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  • Stones River National Battlefield

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  • Waco Mammoth National Monument

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Utah

  • Arches National Park

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  • Bryce Canyon-National Park

    Bryce Canyon National Park features 36,000-acres of rocks that change color and shape as the daylight dances across them. The canyon is actually not a canyon, but was rather carved from ice wedging into the rocks, forming the hoodoos. The park has so much to offer and it all depends on how long you plan to spend in the park. If for nothing else, stop at the Bryce Canyon Visitor Center for the fabulous views, explore the park with one of the nearby hikes, and then take the scenic drive to Rainbow Point for northern views of the Park and the snaking rim of the Pink Cliffs. Take advantage of the many side-trips and pull-outs on your return back to UT-12. To explore the canyon’s floor, rent a horse or mule from the Bryce Canyon Lodge.

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  • Canyonlands National Park

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  • Capitol Reef National Park

    Capitol Reef National Park has numerous outcroppings caused by the folding in the Earth’s crust. The area is home to many petroglyphs depicting the Fremont Indians life in this area. The park is home to the Hickman Natural Bridge which is a sandstone bridge that spans 133-feet. For a beautiful side trip, we recommend Cathedral Valley Road, a dirt road which meanders through the Capitol Reef National Park where you can enjoy the canyons and monolithic rocks spread across the desert. On the way through the valley, take advantage of the overlooks and many short hikes near the overlooks.

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  • Cedar Breaks National Monument

    Created by millions of years of sedimentation, uplift and erosion the giant amphitheater sits at 10,000 feet of elevation, 2,000 feet deep, spanning 3 miles, and unforgettable views of blazing colors as the sun dances across the formations. The five mile scenic drive passes the Monument’s main attractions including the four overlooks, all highly recommended stops.

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  • Dinosaur National Monument

    Declared a National Monument in 1915, it is one of the most productive sources of dinosaur bones in the world. The Fossil Discovery Hiking Trail allows you to see fossilized bones embedded in the rocky cliff face — where you can imagine what life must have been like with these giants of the Jurassic roaming the land. Stop at the Visitor Center to take advantage of all the monument has to offer including guided tours. This area also features native pictographs, spectacular scenery and whitewater river trips.

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  • Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

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  • Golden Spike National Historical Park

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  • Hovenweep National Monument

    Along the canyon rim stand two, oddly-shaped stone towers created by the master builders of the Anasazi’s people, the meaning of which are still unknown. The Monument also has a total of six groups of ruins and is known for its square, oval, and D-shaped towers. Explore the Square Tower Group walking the two mile loop trail from the Visitor Center. Stargazing is a wonderful way to immerse yourself in this peaceful and moving setting. Make a night of it with camping which is open year-round on a first-come, first-served basis.

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  • Natural Bridges National Monument

    The Monument is home to three sandstone natural bridges which were formed when meandering streams slowly cut through the canyon walls. Along the driving loop, you will encounter Sipapu, the second largest natural bridge in the world, Kachina, the youngest, and Owachomo, the oldest all named in honor of the Native Americans that made this area their home. Trails from these bridges will bring you to the canyon’s floor. For information, the Natural Bridges National Monument Visitor Center is just a little further east on UT-95.

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  • Rainbow Bridge National Monument

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  • Timpanogos Cave National Monument

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  • Zion National Park

    Some of Utah’s most amazing scenery lies along the Zion Canyon, where sun-kissed sandstone cliffs and soaring monoliths reach for the sky, constantly changing color. A feast for the eyes, jagged stone, prickly sagebrush, carved and cracked canyons, water both rough and serene, combine to create an unimaginable majestic beauty.

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Vermont

Virgin Islands

Virginia

  • Appomattox Court House National Historical Park

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  • Assateague Island National Seashore

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  • Blue Ridge Parkway

    One of the most popular scenic drives in the United States, the Blue Ridge Parkway travels along the southern Appalachian Mountains, connecting Shenandoah National Park in Virginia to Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina. The cliff-hugging road offers sweeping views, fascinating and diverse flora and fauna, geologic wonders and a myriad of recreation opportunities. Spectacular in any season, the Parkway is renowned for its fall foliage which displays a vivid palette of color. Sections of the Parkway may be closed in winter; it is advisable to check for up-to-date road conditions before heading out.

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  • Booker T Washington National Monument

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  • Cape Henry Memorial Part of Colonial

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  • Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park

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  • Chesapeake Bay

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  • Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Watertrailway

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  • Colonial National Historical Park

    Colonial National Historical Park preserves the battlefields that changed the course of the American Revolutionary War. Drive the 7-mile self-guided tour through the battlefields and see fortifications, cannons and historic buildings. Learn more at the Yorktown Battlefield Visitor Center or by taking one of the free ranger-guided tours.

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  • Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

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  • Fort Monroe National Monument

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  • Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park

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  • George Washington Birthplace National Monument

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  • George Washington Memorial Parkway

    A journey through history, this scenic drive follows the Potomac River from President George Washington’s Mount Vernon home, past the nation’s Capital to the Great Falls of the Potomac. This is relatively short drive but hours can be spent walking in the footsteps of history.

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  • Great Falls Park

    Flowing over the jagged rocks, the Potomac River is a sight to behold. View the falls from three overlooks, two of which are handicap accessible. Stop at the Visitor Center for exhibits on the history of the area, guided programs and hiking maps. The park is a haven for recreation such as horseback riding, cycling, fishing, whitewater boating and rock climbing and climbers must register at the visitor center beforehand. A National Park, there is a fee charged is covered by the America the Beautiful Interagency Pass.

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  • Green Springs National Historic Landmark District

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  • Harpers Ferry National Historical Park

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  • Historic Jamestowne Part of Colonial National Historical Park

    Immerse yourself in the nation’s beginnings, retracing the steps of Captain John Smith and Pocahontas. The Island Loop Drive (which also can be done on foot or bike) is a 5-mile trip back in time, where you can experience the daily life, industrialism and challenges faced by the colonists, via paintings and interpretive panels. Visit the excavation site of the 1607 James Fort and the Jamestown Glasshouse one of England’s first attempts to create a manufacturing presence in America. Learn more at the museum, or by taking one of the many free guided tours or living history tours with costumed interpreters. An entrance fee is charged and covered by the America the Beautiful Pass.

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  • Maggie L Walker National Historic Site

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  • Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail

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  • Petersburg National Battlefield

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  • Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail

    At Theodore Roosevelt Island which honors the 26th President of the United States, walk a section of the Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail, a non-continuous 830-mile network of trail, and along with serene beauty of nature, be ready for muddy patches and hills.

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  • Prince William Forest Park

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  • Richmond National Battlefield Park

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  • Shenandoah National Park

    Traveling through Shenandoah National Park and along the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains, offers sensational views of gently rolling hills to the east and the rich agricultural valley to the west. With two peaks over 4,000 feet, waterfalls, lush stream hollows, and a wide range of recreation opportunities, discover a world rugged, yet serene.

    The Shenandoah National Park came into being in 1926. Years of deforestation making way for hunting, cropland, and pastures for grazing sheep and cattle damaged the region. Returning the land to its natural state was a priority and today 95 percent of the region is reforested. Skyline Drive began construction in 1931, a project approved by Herbert Hoover in hopes of stimulating the economy, and completed 8 years later. The ruins of cabins and farm buildings are testament to the history of the people that lived here and over 340 structures in the park are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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  • Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts

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  • Yorktown Battlefield - Part of Colonial National Historical Park

    As you continue south towards Yorktown, you arrive at the Colonial National Historical Park which preserves the battlefields that changed the course of the American Revolutionary War. Drive the 7-mile self-guided tour through the battlefields and see fortifications, cannons and historic buildings. Learn more at the Yorktown Battlefield Visitor Center or by taking one of the free ranger-guided tours.

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Washington

  • Arlington House the Robert E. Lee Memorial

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  • Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve

    The Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve is a 22 square mile district including farmlands, historical buildings, parks, and beaches. The town of Coupeville preserves the community as a living museum depicting how the land was used since Captain George Vancouver first arrived here in 1792. Coupeville is a quaint town to visit for a stroll, dining, visiting art galleries and local shops.

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  • Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

    The 366-acre Fort Vancouver National Site in Vancouver Washington encompasses multiple attractions, Fort Vancouver, Pearson Air Museum and Pearson Field Education Center, and the McLoughlin House. Orient yourself at the Visitor Center, which features a film, interpretive exhibits and artifacts, as well as tours and educational programs. Explore the reconstructed Fort Site with buildings such as the Bakehouse, Blacksmith Shop and Chief Factor’s Residence. Officer’s Row features 22 restored 19th-century buildings, all listed on the National Historic Register. Large expanses of grass and forest surround the buildings with ample opportunity to let kids run free and enjoy a picnic. Don’t miss 3rd Saturday Living History demonstrations portraying members of the Civil War-era 1st Oregon Volunteer Cavalry.

    1501 E Evergreen Boulevard
    Vancouver, WA
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  • Klondike Gold Rush (Seattle Unit) National Park

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  • Lake Chelan National Recreation Area

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  • Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area

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  • Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

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  • Manhattan Project National Historical Park

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  • Minidoka National Historic Site

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  • Mount Rainier National Park

    At 14,411 feet of elevation, Mount Rainier is the highest mountain in the state of Washington and of the Cascade Mountain Range. It is also the most glaciated mountain in the continental United States. The spectacular Mount Rainier National Park has five developed areas (Longmire, Paradise, Ohanapecosh, Sunrise, and Carbon/Mowich), each varied in terrain but all offering extraordinary views and opportunities for recreation.

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  • Nez Perce National Historical Park

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  • Olympic National Park

    The 17-mile drive up Hurricane Ridge Road (reach it, via Race Street S.) delivers awe-inspiring views with every turn, as it winds its way to Hurricane Ridge at an elevation of 5,242 feet. The road is open 24 hours a day from mid-May to October. In winter, it is open primarily on weekends and we recommend checking for conditions before heading out. Along the way up is Heart O’ Hills Campground which is open year-round. At Hurricane Ridge, trails for every level explore this picture perfect sub-alpine landscape of snow-capped mountains, rich forest and brilliant wildflower meadows. Many are paved and accessible for wheelchair and strollers, such as the 1-mile round trip paved Cirque Rim or Big Meadow Trails. For a more of a workout, take the 3.2-mile round trip Hurricane Hill which gains 700-feet of elevation and delivers expansive views. Stop in the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center for hiking and regional information, ranger-led events, exhibits on the natural and cultural history of the Olympic Mountains, bookstore, snack bar and gift shop.

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  • San Juan Island National Historical Park

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  • Whitman Mission National Historic Site

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Washington DC

  • African American Civil War Memorial

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  • Anacostia Park

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  • Baltimore Washington Parkway

    A 29-mile highway that connects Baltimore, MD and Washington, D.C.

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  • Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument

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  • Capitol Hill Parks

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  • Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site

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  • Chesapeake Bay

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  • Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Watertrailway

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  • Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park

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  • Civil War Defenses of Washington

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  • Constitution Gardens

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  • Ford’s Theatre

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  • Fort Dupont Park

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  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

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  • Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

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  • George Washington Memorial Parkway

    A journey through history, this scenic drive follows the Potomac River from President George Washington’s Mount Vernon home, past the nation’s Capital to the Great Falls of the Potomac. This is relatively short drive but hours can be spent walking in the footsteps of history.

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  • Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens

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  • Korean War Veterans Memorial

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  • LBJ Memorial Grove on the Potomac

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  • Lincoln Memorial

    One of the greatest Presidents of the United States, Abraham Lincoln took office moments before the Civil War began and worked to reunite the United States. His foresight and leadership are still studied today. The Lincoln Memorial is inspiring. The building design is based on a Greek temple with 36 doric columns, each representing a state of the Union at the time of Lincoln’s death. Enjoy great views of the Capital from its lofty heights.

    On the other side of the Lincoln Memorial is the Washington Monument.

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  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

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  • Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site

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  • Meridian Hill Park

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  • National Capital Parks East

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  • National Mall and Memorial Parks

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  • Old Post Office Tower

    The Old Post Office was built in 1899. The clock tower offers panoramic views of D.C.

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  • Peirce Mill

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  • Pennsylvania Avenue

  • Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail

    At Theodore Roosevelt Island which honors the 26th President of the United States, walk a section of the Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail, a non-continuous 830-mile network of trail, and along with serene beauty of nature, be ready for muddy patches and hills.

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  • President’s Park

    The White House was designed by James Hoban and originally built between 1792-1800. It was rebuilt after being set ablaze by the British during the War of 1812. The White House is spacious, boasting 132 rooms and 35 bathrooms. Most people take photos from outside the gate. If you would like to tour inside, you must submit a request to your Member of Congress, a minimum of 21 days in advance, and a maximum of 6 months, which we highly recommend as there are a limited number of places available. Tours are free.

    1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW
    Washington, DC
    whitehouse.gov
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  • Rock Creek Park

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  • The Old Stone House

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  • Theodore Roosevelt Island

    Theodore Roosevelt Island honors the United States 26th president, President Theodore Roosevelt. In addition to many new initiatives, one of the greatest contributions of President Theodore Roosevelt was the creation of the National Parks Program that started with Yellowstone National Park.

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  • Thomas Jefferson Memorial

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  • Vietnam Veterans Memorial

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  • Washington Monument

    Honoring George Washington, the Washington Monument is the most prominent structure in D.C. The obelisk stands 555-feet tall and was built in 1884. Vising the monument is free but requires a timed ticket which can be picked up on a first come, first served basis. It is highly recommended that you reserve a ticket online at the National Park Service ticket website. There is a service charge but well-worth it, as tickets are often reserved months in advance.

    Across the way is the Lincoln Memorial.

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  • World War Ii Memorial

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West Virginia

Wisconsin

  • Apostle Islands National Lakeshore

    The Apostle Islands National Lakeshore comprise 21 islands and a 12-mile section on the mainland. But the best vantage points are by boat, so make sure you have planned a minimum of a half-day for exploring. In the surrounding towns of the Bayfield Peninsula are outfitters offering boat rentals, guided tours, fishing and sailing charters, ferry and water taxis. The National Park Service features a variety of narrated tours and shuttle services which depart from Bayfield through Apostle Islands Cruises, a NPS authorized concessionaire. Each island is unique and offers interesting things to do whether you’re into hiking, paddling, scuba diving, camping or just taking in the breathtaking views. In winter, if Lake Superior freezes to a safe depth, the sea caves are accessible by foot and open to the public. If the opportunity arises, do not miss the magical and dramatic display of ice-draped rock formations. Check the Apostle Islands website for opening dates.

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  • Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway

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Wyoming

  • Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area

    The views are outstanding as you experience desert-like surroundings, wildlife used to harsh conditions and millions of years of erosion creating unsurpassed beauty. Dry climate, immense rocky outcrops and the lack of trees are a striking change and awe-inspiring. Get a close up view of the canyon by heading north into Montana and stopping at the Devil Canyon Overlook where the earth drops about 1,000 feet below. Many hike trailheads are near here so be sure you made that stop at the visitor center as they are not easily seen from the road. You can also experience the canyon from the water by taking a boat tour.

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  • Devils Tower National Monument

    Devils Tower is a 60-million-year-old, 867-foot butte created by magma that cooled and solidified underground and was then exposed by millions of years of erosion of the sedimentary soil that surrounds it. A 3-mile side-trip will bring you to the visitor center and an easy paved trail through light forest that winds around the tower. This scenic area is great for picture taking, climbing on some of the large boulders that lay tumbled at the base and picnics. Don’t forget to stop by the Prairie Dog Field on your way to see and hear these adorable animals in their natural habitat.

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  • Fort Laramie National Historic Site

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  • Fossil Butte National Monument

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  • Grand Teton National Park

    Amidst the spectacular beauty of the Teton Mountains, experience the passion and hardships of Native Americans, homesteaders, ranchers and miners. The Teton Range dominates the landscape, growing over the last 9 million years from rocks that are over 2.5-billion years old. Glaciers and ice ages left many lakes which create an ideal habitat for beavers, muskrats, otters, American white pelicans and larger mammals like elk and moose.

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  • Yellowstone National Park

    Established in 1872, Yellowstone National Park was the first U.S. National Park. Encompassing the caldera of the Yellowstone Super Volcano which continues to fuel the area’s geothermal vents, geysers, and hot springs, the parks diverse landscape of forest, mountains, rivers and wildlife make it a must-see destination.

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